DECEMBER BOOK CLUBS IN THE SHOP

Monday 2nd December at 10.30am & 7pm.
Wednesday 4th December at 7pm and Friday 6th December at 10.30am.

Once Upon a River by Diane Setterfield

An exquisitely crafted multi-layered mystery brimming with folklore, suspense and romance, as well as with the urgent scientific curiosity of the Darwinian age, Once Upon a River is as richly atmospheric as Setterfield’s bestseller The Thirteenth Tale.

‘Infused with the spirit of Jane Eyre, Rebecca and The Woman in White‘ – Independent
‘I was completely spellbound‘ – Ruth Hogan
‘A delight…I devoured it’ – Jo Baker
‘Truly extraordinary’ – Dinah Jeffries

Some say the river drowned her…Some say it brought her back to life

On a dark midwinter’s night in an ancient inn on the Thames, the regulars are entertaining themselves by telling stories when the door bursts open and in steps an injured stranger. In his arms is the drowned corpse of a child.

Hours later, the dead girl stirs, takes a breath and returns to life.

Is it a miracle?  Is it magic?  And who does the little girl belong to?

“Diane’s masterful storytelling draws you in to a beguiling tale, full of twists and turns like the river at its heart, and just as rich and intriguing.” (M L Stedman, bestselling author of The Light Between Oceans)

Swift and entrancing, profound and beautiful. Give yourself a treat and read it!” (Madeline Miller, Orange Prize-winning author of The Song of Achilles and Circe)

NOVEMBER BOOK CLUBS IN THE SHOP

Monday 4th November at 10.30am & 7pm.
Wednesday 6th November at 7pm and Friday 8th November at 10.30am.

An Orchestra of Minorities by Chigozie Obioma Shortlisted for the Booker Prize 2019

A young farmer named Chinonso prevents a woman from falling to her death. Bonded by this strange night on the bridge, he and Ndali fall in love, but it is a mismatch according to her family who reject him because of his lowly status. Is it love or madness that makes Chinonso think he can change his destiny?

Set across Nigeria and Cyprus, An Orchestra of Minorities, written in the mythic style of the Igbo tradition, weaves a heart-wrenching tale about fate versus free will.

‘A remarkable talent’Independent

‘Few contemporary novels achieve the seductive panache of Obioma’s heightened language, with its mixture of English, Igbo and colourful African-English phrases, and the startling clarity of the dialogue. The story is extreme; yet its theme is a bid for mercy for that most fragile of creatures – a human’ Eileen Battersby, Guardian

OCTOBER BOOK CLUBS in the SHOP

Monday 30th September at 10.30am & 7pm.
Wednesday 2nd October at 7pm and Friday 4th October at 10.30am.

SO MUCH LIFE LEFT OVER by LOUIS de BERNIERES

A heartbreaking story of love, loss and survival from the multi-million copy bestselling author of Captain Corelli’s Mandolin.

Returning from life as a fighter pilot in the First World War, Daniel is struggling to put the trauma of the Western Front behind him.

As the 1920s dawn, he and his wife Rosie move to a tea plantation in Ceylon with their small daughter to make a fresh start. Yet navigating their new world could test their marriage to its limits.

Back in England, Rosie’s sisters are dealing with impossible challenges in their searches for family, purpose and happiness. These are precarious times, and taking unconventional means may be the only way to get what they want. Around them the world changes, and events in Germany take a dark and forbidding turn. And soon there is no going back…

SEPTEMBER BOOK CLUBS in the SHOP

Monday 2nd September at 10.30am & 7pm.
Wednesday 4th September at 7pm and Friday 6th September at 10.30am.

CLOCK DANCE by ANNE TYLER

A bittersweet novel of family and self-discovery from the bestselling, award-winning author of A Spool of Blue Thread

Willa Drake can count on one hand the defining moments of her life: her mother’s disappearance when she was just a child, being proposed to at an airport at the age of twenty-one, the accident that would leave her a widow in her forties. Each time, Willa ended up on a path laid out for her by others.

So when she receives a phone call from a stranger informing her that her son’s ex-girlfriend has been shot, she drops everything and flies across the country. The spur-of-the moment decision to look after this woman and her nine-year-old daughter leads Willa into uncharted territory and the eventual realisation that it’s never too late to choose your own path.

‘She is and always will be my favourite author’ Liane Moriarty

AUGUST BOOK CLUBS IN THE SHOP

Monday 5th August at 10.30am & 7pm.
Wednesday 7th August at 7pm and Friday 9th August at 10.30am.

The Lost Letters of William Woolf by Helen Cullen

SHORTLISTED FOR NEWCOMER OF THE YEAR, IRISH BOOK AWARDS

Lost letters have only one hope for survival . . .

Inside the Dead Letters Depot in East London, William Woolf is one of thirty letter detectives who spend their days solving mysteries. Missing postcodes, illegible handwriting, rain-smudged ink, lost address labels, torn packages, forgotten street names – they are all the culprits of missed birthdays, broken hearts, unheard confessions, pointless accusations, unpaid bills and unanswered prayers.

When William discovers letters addressed simply to ‘My Great Love’ his work takes on new meaning.

Written by a woman to a soulmate she hasn’t met yet, the missives stir William in ways he didn’t know were possible. Soon he begins to wonder: Could William be her great love?

William must follow the clues in Winter’s letters to solve his most important mystery yet: the human heart.

‘If you liked Harold Fry and Me Before You, you will love Cullen’s nostalgic debut. This life-affirming book will draw you in and keep you there’ Independent

JULY BOOK CLUBS IN THE SHOP

Monday 1st July at
10.30am & 7pm.
Wednesday 3rd July at 7pm and Friday 5th July at 10.30am.

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

SHORTLISTED FOR INTERNATIONAL WRITER OF THE YEAR, SPECSAVERS NATIONAL BOOK AWARDS 2018

Everyone in Shaker Heights was talking about it that summer: how Isabelle, the last of the Richardson children, had finally gone around the bend and burned the house down.

In Shaker Heights, a placid, progressive suburb of Cleveland, everything is meticulously planned – from the layout of the winding roads, to the colours of the houses, to the successful lives its residents will go on to lead. And no one embodies this spirit more than Elena Richardson, whose guiding principle is playing by the rules.

Enter Mia Warren – an enigmatic artist and single mother- who arrives in this idyllic bubble with her teenage daughter Pearl, and rents a house from the Richardsons. Soon Mia and Pearl become more than just tenants: all four Richardson children are drawn to the mother-daughter pair. But Mia carries with her a mysterious past, and a disregard for the rules that threatens to upend this carefully ordered community.

When old family friends attempt to adopt a Chinese-American baby, a custody battle erupts that dramatically divides the town – and puts Mia and Elena on opposing sides. Suspicious of Mia and her motives, Elena is determined to uncover the secrets in Mia’s past. But her obsession will come at an unexpected and devastating cost…

‘Beautifully written, completely charming, and extremely wise on the subject of adolescence and influence’ Nick Hornby

JUNE BOOK CLUBS IN THE SHOP

Monday 3rd June at
10.30am & 7pm.
Wednesday 5th June at 7pm and Friday 7th May at 10.30am.

In 1940, eighteen-year old Juliet Armstrong is reluctantly recruited into the world of espionage. Sent to an obscure department of MI5 tasked with monitoring the comings and goings of British Fascist sympathisers, she discovers the work to be by turns both tedious and terrifying. But after the war has ended, she presumes the events of those years have been relegated to the past for ever.
**The magnificent new novel by award-winner Kate Atkinson**

MAY BOOK CLUBS IN THE SHOP

Monday 29th April at 10.30am and 7pm. Wednesday 1st May at 7pm and Friday 3rd May at 10.30am.

The uplifting true story of the couple who lost everything and embarked on a journey of salvation across the windswept South West coastline.

THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER & SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2018 COSTA BIOGRAPHY AWARD & WAINWRIGHT GOLDEN BEER BOOK PRIZE 2018

‘A beautiful, thoughtful, lyrical story of homelessness, human strength and endurance’ Guardian

Just days after Raynor learns that Moth, her husband of 32 years, is terminally ill, their home is taken away and they lose their livelihood. With nothing left and little time, they make the brave and impulsive decision to walk the 630 miles of the sea-swept South West Coast Path, from Somerset to Dorset, via Devon and Cornwall.

Carrying only the essentials for survival on their backs, they live wild in the ancient, weathered landscape of cliffs, sea and sky. Yet through every step, every encounter and every test along the way, their walk becomes a remarkable journey.

The Salt Path is an honest and life-affirming true story of coming to terms with grief and the healing power of the natural world. Ultimately, it is a portrayal of home, and how it can be lost, rebuilt and rediscovered in the most unexpected ways.

APRIL BOOK CLUBS IN THE SHOP

Monday 1st April at 10.30am and 7pm. Wednesday 3rd April at 7pm and Friday 5th April at 10.30am.

From the Man Booker shortlisted author of Harvest.

Alfred Busi, famed in his town for his music and songs, is mourning the recent death of his wife and quietly living out his days in the large villa he has always called home. Then one night Busi is attacked by a creature he disturbs as it raids the contents of his larder. Busi is convinced that what assaulted him was no animal, but a child, ‘innocent and wild’, and his words fan the flames of old rumour – of an ancient race of people living in the bosk surrounding the town – and new controversy: the town’s paupers, the feral wastrels at its edges, must be dealt with. Once and for all.

Lyrical and warm, intimate and epic, The Melody by Jim Crace tracks the few days that will see Busi and the town he loves altered irrevocably. This is a story about grief and ageing, about reputation and the loss of it, about love and music and the peculiar way myth seeps into real life. And it is a political novel too – a rallying cry to protect those we persecute.

Strange, unsettling, brilliant . . . one of our most original and inventive novelists (Observer)

MARCH BOOK CLUBS IN THE SHOP

Monday 4th March at 10.30am and 7pm. Wednesday 6th March at 7pm and Friday 8th March at 10.30am.

SHORTLISTED FOR THE IRISH BOOK AWARDS 2018

Set in a frozen winter landscape, the new novel from the prize-winning, acclaimed author David Park is a psychologically astute, expertly crafted portrait of a father’s inner life and a family in crisis

An Irish Times Book of 2018

I am entering the frozen land, although to which country it belongs I cannot say.

The world is shrouded in snow. Transport has ground to a halt. Tom must venture out into a transformed and treacherous landscape to collect his son, sick and stranded in student lodgings.

But on this solitary drive from Belfast to Sunderland, Tom will be drawn into another journey, one without map or guide, and is forced to chart pathways of family history haunted by memory and clouded in regret.

Written in spare, crystalline prose by one of the most important voices in contemporary Irish writing, Travelling in a Strange Land is a work of exquisite loss and transformative grace. It is a novel about fathers and sons, grief, memory, family and love; about the gulfs that lie between us and those we love, and the wrong turns that we take on our way to find them.